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Click here for the History of Legion Baseball in Wisconsin Rapids

1925
"In this city on July 17, 1925, by action of the South Dakota Department of The American Legion, the nationwide organization of Legion Junior Baseball was first proposed as a program of service to the youth of America". Those words are inscribed on a marble monument in the community of Milbank, South Dakota as a reminder of the beginning of this fine Americanism program. The program's years of existence can be explained best by a portion of that inscription: "A program of service to the youth of America." Since its beginning, over ten million young men have played Legion Baseball.

1926
American Legion Baseball became a National program by convention action in 1925, and the first National Tournament was held in 1926. Only 16 states were represented in this first year of national operation. In 1927, National competition was prevented because of insufficient funds due to the national convention being held in Paris; however, state competition was strong. In 1928, Mr. Dan Sowers, the Director of the National Americanism Commission, appeared before the Executive Council of Baseball in Chicago, which agreed to underwrite the national program up to $50,000. With the exception of two years, the Major Leagues have continually supported American Legion Baseball. Major League Baseball continues to make a financial contribution each year.

1929
During the 1929 season, every state ENTERED teams into competition. The National Broadcasting Company originated its nationwide broadcast of the finals. Nineteen thirty-one marked the first appearance in championship play of a player who was later to become a big-league great. Kirby Higbe hurled a complete game for Columbia, South Carolina, and lost the final game in the 14th inning, 1-0. Ten years later, he was the National League's top pitcher.

1938
In 1938, the finals were broadcast to more than 3,000 radio stations, bringing the series to every section of the country. Major League umpires were used for the first time that year. Nineteen-forty and 194l marked the years that American Legion Baseball became an established national institution for American youth. During the war years, the program was restricted but continued its service to our nation's youngsters. The post-war years saw the continued growth of the program and the nation's realization of the importance of this type of activity for boys of all age groups.

1949
In 1949, the selection of an American Legion Player of the Year was originated. This was arranged through the cooperation of Mr. Robert Quinn, Director of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York.

1950
Nineteen-fifty marked the first year any player ever won the Hillerich and Bradsby Batting Championship trophy two consecutive years. J. W. Porter, Oakland catcher, accomplished this with a .55l average in l949 and a .488 average in l950.

1960's
The sixties saw the program grow stronger under the leadership of George W. Rulon, Program Coordinator for American Legion Baseball, who held that post from 1961 until 1987. Upon his retirement, The American Legion Player of the Year Award was renamed the George W. Rulon Player of the Year in honor of the late Program Coordinator.

1970's
The seventies saw three more national awards established by the National Americanism Commission. The Dr. Irvin L. (Click) Cowger RBI award, Rawlings Big Stick Award, and the Bob Feller pitching awards were established based on players' statistics in Regional and World Series Tournaments.

1982
In 1982, the National Americanism Commission adopted the eight-site, eight team, double elimination Regional Tournament format. Sixty-four of the best teams in the country begin National competition at the Regional.

1998
In 1998, The American Legion established a national baseball scholarship. A $1,000 scholarship is awarded to each participating Department. A total of $51,000 is awarded annually to 51 outstanding American Legion Baseball players. Recipients are selected by each Department Baseball Committee based upon leadership, character, scholarship and financial need. Players are nominated by local Legion Post. Scholarship applications are distributed to each team. Players nominated must be sponsored by a local American Legion Post, and must be a graduated senior or in their final year of high school. Three letters of recommendation are required from the Team Manager, American Legion Post Commander and community or school leader. Players can request an application from the local team manager. Applications must be mailed to Department Headquarters Office by July 15.

2000
In 2000, nearly $11 million was raised by local Legion Posts to sponsor the 5,300 registered American Legion Baseball teams and other athletic teams in their communities. The purpose continues to be in 2002 the same as was in 1925, "An investment in America's Youth." The history of American Legion Baseball has proven that America's youth receive on the baseball diamond a thorough understanding of the true value of sportsmanship, leadership and individual character building.

2002
The American Legion, America's largest veteran's organization, sponsors this annual baseball competition. Nearly $1,000,000 is spent on transportation, meals and lodging for the 1,400 players who compete each year in the eight Regional and National Championship tournaments. Tournament game fees and sponsorship by Major League Baseball offset part of this cost. Nearly $600,000 in expenses is paid from The American Legion Life Insurance Fund, which underwrites this and other Youth Activities programs of The American Legion.



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